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Up Topic Dog Boards / Health / Double FCP in rescue dog
- By susieodea [gb] Date 28.05.17 10:37 GMT
We adopted a young rescue in December, after having our 11 year old lab PTS a year ago because of long lasting OCD and Achilles issues which led to no great quality of life. We went for a rescue cross breed this time because we thought the health issues would be diminished.

Cush started limping on his front left leg a couple of months ago. We rested him for a month of short lead walks and he seemed better, but then limped again after return to more exercise.  After having X-rays we discovered he has an old fragmented coronoid process where there is cartilage arthritis and new bone overlay. The vet said if we had an arthroscopy he may be able to scrape off the overlay and any loose fragments but the issue would return because it was historical. He said elbow replacements are still pretty much in their infancy and the success rate isn't fabulous..

We decided to look at amputation as a long term pain free option, however when we X-rayed the right leg we discovered more FCP, with the right leg in even worse condition than the left.

Cush is now on full strength Carprieve and he's just had his third injection of a month of Cartrofen, which hasn't as yet made a difference.  He's limping badly after shortish walks and sometimes stops and lies down on the walk, which seems to indicate pain.  Because he has a lot of Collie and sight hound in the mix, he's frustrated without exercise. He plays in the garden with the kitten and seems pretty comfortable and happy when he's mooching around the house but really pushes for walks.

We've been told by two vets that double elbow replacement would not give great quality of life; that movement would be greatly reduced and they may not work. We've toyed with a double amputation but have pretty much discounted that idea.  He's only 18 months old and an active breed, so we want to find some way of giving him a good quality of life without too much pain. The bad news is that our top of the range insurance doesn't cover this because it's classed as a pre existing condition.

We had thought about getting another older, calmer dog for company without too much exercise. Any thoughts?

Has anyone here gone through the same issue and decision process? We would appreciate any advice.
- By mixedpack [gb] Date 28.05.17 10:52 GMT
How terribly sad for you and Cush,  I don't have any relevant experience but I would expect him to try and play with a companion even older and steadier, hard though it is perhaps the way forward is to give him maximum pain relief and let him enjoy his life as best he can until you feel it's too much for him.  Pedigree or crossbred all dogs can be affected by a variety of conditions and it's really bad luck for you, I hope you succeed in finding a solution.
- By Nikita [gb] Date 30.05.17 19:58 GMT
I think mixedpack is right.  Go hell for leather on pain relief, and concentrate on quality over quantity.  And remember that different dogs respond to different things - if the carprophen and cartrieve aren't working, it doesn't mean that something else won't!

As for quality: brain games is what you need.  Use his food as entertainment - scatter it in the lawn, put it in treat balls and puzzle toys, hide it around the house and so on.  Train gentle tricks that won't tax the affected joints too much, and in short sessions.  I have a farm collie here who is happy only getting one 20 minute walk a week (because of phobias in her case), because I keep her busy with treat balls and searches the rest of the time.  Ditto my malinois who currently has undiagnosed pain, so can't go for long or energetic walks.

And look at supplements.  In particular, I would look at golden paste, which is a very potent anti-inflammatory, and perhaps look at CBD oil as well as a painkiller.  Or something like tramadol may be a better option, as it blocks the pain messages going to the brain.
- By susieodea [gb] Date 30.05.17 21:24 GMT
Thanks mixedpack. I think you're right about getting another dog. it was a knee jerk reaction to the news. After spending time with a friend's quiet dog over the weekend I realise you're right - there's no way he wouldn't want to play.
- By susieodea [gb] Date 30.05.17 21:33 GMT
And thank you Nikita. It's heartening to know someone else has a collie breed which can be managed without too much exercise. I've already got him on golden paste with high curcumin, GOPO rose hip powder, Devils claw and green lipped mussel, as well as various oils.  I think I may have gone a bit overboard on the supplements tbh!

I've tried him with some puzzles but they seem too simple for him.. Anything you might suggest for a collie? And where can I get CBD oil?
- By furriefriends [gb] Date 30.05.17 22:41 GMT
Cbd oil have a look to cannabis brothers ,love cbd or Canine heath concern shop . There quite a few others as well if u Google
- By Merlot [gb] Date 31.05.17 09:44 GMT
Would be worth investigating this therapy to see if it could help ? :- http://www.vet4life.co.uk/platelet-enhancement-therapy/
- By Nikita [gb] Date 31.05.17 11:23 GMT

> I've tried him with some puzzles but they seem too simple for him.. Anything you might suggest for a collie?


It's finding what works for the individual, TBH.  Puzzle toys are great for many dogs but for Phoebe are a waste of time - she needs to be mobile when she's doing this sort of thing so treat balls are her bag.  The difficulty with her was then finding one that a) fit in her mouth b) was very tough, because one of her foibles is to grab whatever's nearby and rag and chomp the hell out of it when I'm getting ready to go out and c) didn't just empty right away!  Eventually I found this one, and it's been brilliant so far:

http://ourpets.com/ourpets/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/2130010793-IQ-Treat-Ball-Medium-2-940x730.jpg

At some point I also want to build one of these:

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/d5/fd/74/d5fd74ef0b50d79bc842e14d523889d5.jpg

Someone built a huge version of that with different panels, puzzles and stuff and I would love to do that too!

https://www.facebook.com/mrmousington/posts/1301940936568697
- By tatty-ead [gb] Date 31.05.17 13:22 GMT
https://fetch.co.uk/kong-treat-wobbler-large-209391011?gclid=CP7K-K6cmtQCFQIcGwodoCgOCA

Have you tried one of these, Zuma has one and loves it,  takes a while to empty - longer than the treat balls I have had and tougher.
- By weimed [gb] Date 01.06.17 16:15 GMT
buster cubes are good. had one for my old girl when she went to kennels and it took her hours to get kibble out.  (weimaraner- clever one and strong and it stood up to abuse well)
- By georgepig [gb] Date 01.06.17 17:07 GMT
Would swimming be beneficial at all?
- By G.Rets [gb] Date 01.06.17 22:40 GMT Upvotes 1
I really do sympathise with you and your poor dog. One of my Goldens was diagnosed with OCD at 5 months and had corrective arthroscopic surgery performed by Ian MacQueen. I was told that she would need to be restricted all her life: no jumping, etc or she would not make "old bones".  All of my 12 Goldens except one ( epileptic) have lived to 13, 14 or 15 but I decided that Saffi should have a normal, enjoyable life with walks the same as the others had had and if she only lived to 8 then it would have been 8 happy years. Saffi was 14 two weeks ago and has always been a very happy girl. Yes she has arthritis. She had TPLO cruciate repair when she was eleven so she does not have a single good leg now. She has taken every supplement that you have mentioned and Metacam daily for about 4 years now.  I know that she is happy. I believe that a dog may cope better with chronic pain, whilst far from ideal. When Saffi reached 8 I was panicking about what I had said when she was 5 months. Saffi has had forest walks daily, running, swimming, chasing for an hour a day. She has had the same life as all of my Goldens . I don't regret doing what I did as I know she has led a normal life and enjoyed every minute.  At the time when she first went lame I agonised over what to do, even considering returning her to her breeder but I am so glad that I didn't.  I wish you all the best with your youngster and would support your decisions but personally would not go for elbow replacements. Swimming probably would be beneficial and trying supplements ( maybe one at a time would be best.)  Good luck.
Up Topic Dog Boards / Health / Double FCP in rescue dog

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