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- By AmandaH [gb] Date 29.08.16 14:38 GMT
Hi All, we have got a lovely westie now at 7 months. He is delightful and we hope he does not lose that bouncy puppy brightness he has. only downside is when playing with other dogs, he is starting to nip at their legs and jump on them. some of the less challenging ones tend to get him 'humping' them. is this normal, because we are thinking about getting him neutered but don't want to change or dull the brightness. any help would be great. I walk on a field where many walkers go and we have all become friendly and its like a dog crèche when they all start playing (the dogs, not the owners :grin:), so I don't want other owners to wish he was sent to sit on the naughty step due to this.
- By Schnauday [gg] Date 29.08.16 20:06 GMT Upvotes 4
At that age humping is just his way of releasing his excitement there is nothing sexual about it so neutering will do nothing to stop it. It's a behaviour you need to distract him from so it doesn't become a learnt behaviour. Call him away using favorite treats or toys so he does the behaviour you want. If he doesn't stop then he will need time out if he humps so he learns he doesn't get to play if he humps. My neighbors dog was neutered at 9 mths to "calm it down" it did nothing now 4 years and it humps everything with a passion, my dog is 3 years old intact and doesn't hump anything.

It is better health wise for a male not to be neutered but they are more challenging to train through the adolescence stage. Please do all the research you can before deciding what to do. Don't just rely on the advise of your vet or old wives tales.
- By AmandaH [gb] Date 30.08.16 14:06 GMT
Thank you for the kind reply. I have been thinking and researching about neutering and get so much conflicting advise. The vet was telling me it helps with testicular cancer and all the other health benefits. but don't want to just get it done as it can't be undone after. I have always had my bitches spayed, but this is the first male dog I have had as a puppy.
- By Brainless [gb] Date 30.08.16 14:17 GMT
This http://www.naiaonline.org/pdfs/LongTermHealthEffectsOfSpayNeuterInDogs.pdf is a balanced stud on pros and cons.

Testicular cancer is rare, on the other hand prostate cancer is more common, and most common in neutered males.
- By Pipsmom [gb] Date 30.08.16 15:09 GMT
I have one intact male Shih Tzu and a spayed female...no humping either
- By furriefriends [gb] Date 30.08.16 16:20 GMT Upvotes 1
http://www.doglistener.co.uk/neutering/spaying_neutering.shtml   interesting article. there are many others but more and more the facts are coming back to neutering before maturity causes more problems than it solves. Yes testicular cancer cannot happen in a castrated dog but many other cancers then increases substantially and certainly far more than the likelyhood of testicular cancer anyway. That is without the risk to ligaments and joints. Also most behaviour problems improve with training and maturity not removing hormones.
With regard to you westies current behaviours lots of distraction into the behaviour you want and offering a reward when he does things right is the way I would go.  Humping is due to many reasons and mostly not dominance . people often believe castration will change this behaviour when it probably wont and can cause more problems
- By MamaBas Date 30.08.16 16:31 GMT Upvotes 1
We have almost never castrated our males and have NEVER had any with testicular cancer.    Further the only guarantee with castration is no puppies which provided the dog is properly contained, shouldn't ever happen.   I'd only castrate for medical need, and at that age, that would probably be for retained testicles - and even then it can wait until the dog is at least a year which is an age I'd want any dog to reach before reconsidering this.    Most problems with a male puppy amount to being sorted out by training!    And although we had a precocious boy who managed to mate (planned, but not necessarily on that heat) at just over 8 months, most puppies doing this kind of humping isn't to do with sex at all.

Of course it's up to you to read up on the subject so you are informed, but please make your own decision about castration.   I would also warn you that with one we had to have done (prostate problems in later life - not cancer), where he'd had no skin problems before being operated on, afterwards he did and as Westies can suffer with skin problems in any case, it's another thing to consider before going ahead with this.

I'd also allow time for the male to mature (as well as you time to make this decision which can't be reversed!).   Not so much with the Westie, but It's best to allow the growth plates to close before neutering.

On balance, from me, it would be don't do this - up the training.

ps    We do spay our bitches, usually when retired from showing/breeding.
- By mixedpack [gb] Date 31.08.16 07:45 GMT
I would say distraction and training as would most of us on here, my friends castrated male is the worst humper I have known and regularly gets an infection due to his devotion to his pillow/fluffy bed/toy etc., rather strangely our border terrier bitch is also a confirmed "leg humper" usually after her dinner. Maturity and having puppies has made no difference to her behaviour and she does it all year round so no seasonal variation. Your westie will most likely grow out of this habit as he matures and I am sure a treat or a toy for doing another behaviour will soon see him come through this phase.
- By Brainless [gb] Date 31.08.16 12:13 GMT
The worst leg lifter I ever knew was a castrated Terrier cross male, so bad that i refused to have him visit, so it doesn't even prevent this nuisance behaviour.
- By Dogz Date 31.08.16 15:22 GMT
I have just made the call to castrate at 18 months.
My boy was till bothering my 8yearold girl too much and marking in two places in the kitchen. I tried a tardak injection and there is no doubt he is more relaxed with it.
I didn't really want to do this but it seems he is going to be better for it.
I'd suggest at 7 months he is just pushing his luck with the other dogs and it is over to you to be wary of his jumping and nipping, as his 'puppy license' will be running out on him soon.

Karen
- By AmandaH [gb] Date 08.09.16 16:15 GMT
Thank you all, I have listened to you all and read the links sent, and have decided not to get him spayed. He is responding to giving him treats to come, and he finds that if he is not playing nicely, that he is put on his lead for the rest of the walk, this has helped so much. plus he got a telling off by a big dog that was not letting him have a sniff. he did hurt him and now has a lump on his jaw that I will have to keep and eye on. but hey, I was so proud, he got up and barked at him with a cry in his voice, so I knew he been scared,now he just barks when the other dog comes close. no making friends there. :grin:
So again, thanks for all you help.
- By Lexy [gb] Date 08.09.16 18:57 GMT

> have decided not to get him spayed


A bitch is spayed , a dog is castrated....they are both neutered  :wink:
- By suejaw Date 08.09.16 19:29 GMT Upvotes 2
Be careful in how he is told off because it can affect them and can cause aggression issues.  A lot of dogs can take it and carry on and others depending on the situation may try and get in there first and either just make noise or  show actual aggression so please be careful.  pro a ly best to keep him on a long line and then you have full control of him
- By debbo198 [gb] Date 09.09.16 23:21 GMT
I totally agree with Suejaw - especially about the long line.  You not only have to keep your dog safe but keep others safe from yours.  It doesn't matter if yours is friendly/only a pup or whatever, other dogs may be scared/ill or aggressive/reactive and you don't want any (or as little as possible) negative Interactions.
- By debbo198 [gb] Date 09.09.16 23:27 GMT
I also wouldn't neuter (castrate/spay) at least until he's fully mature and you have done lots of research.
Up Topic Other Boards / Say Hello / Hi, new to the forum and hope to get lots of helpful advice

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