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Up Topic Dog Boards / Controversial Stuff / Should Husky's Be Banned On Welfare Grounds
- By Hethspaw [gb] Date 29.05.12 05:20 GMT
Over this past 8 years or so, & based on what I have read on forums such as this, owers of huskeys' are told they will never recall once adult & can never be let off lead for that reason.

There is no question at all, a dog so confined to spend its life as a prisoner, pulling at the end of a leash, with a noose structure, politly known as a collar, maintaining its' captivity is going to spend a life not worth living as a canine.

The predicable result, the dogs become so disruptive and maladjusted they become no longer an an enjoyment to their human owners but a tiresome burden & reduce, to the point of complete ruin, the quality of life for the entire human family the human family get rid of the dog.

The current notification of its inabilty to take any more Huskey ex prisoners a huskey rescue says says it all (1) "we are closed for admissions" on another (2) "we simply cannot cope"

I put the blame of the current crisis, with no end in sight, in fact the opposite, entirley down to the hidden agenda suspects, i.e. the secular so called positive, mainly 'treat' training, cult.

That aside blame solves no problems, my question is, do folks think it is now time to ban Husky's from UK on the grounds of animal welfare? which what animal rights extremists have been aiming for via the 'positive training' industry & passed on through forums such as these as one of the areas for transmitting indoctrination techniques for years.

Refs

1. http://www.shcgbwelfare.org.uk/

2. http://www.shwauk.org.uk/
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- By Hethspaw [gb] Date 29.05.12 05:26 GMT
Comparisons of emotional experession & experience of treat trained dog & drive trained dog.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XCI_FGAyXv0
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- By Jeangenie [gb] Date 29.05.12 06:37 GMT

>The current notification of its inabilty to take any more Huskey ex prisoners a huskey rescue says says it all (1) "we are closed for admissions" on another (2) "we simply cannot cope"


>I put the blame of the current crisis, with no end in sight, in fact the opposite, entirley down to the hidden agenda suspects, i.e. the secular so called positive, mainly 'treat' training, cult.


Not at all - it's the fallout from the 'Snowdogs' films, which are very popular with families. St Bernards suffered the same problem after the Beethoven films; dalmatians suffer a similar problem with every remake of 101 dalmatians; Dogues de Bordeaux were exploited and over-produced after Turner and Hooch ...

>There is no question at all, a dog so confined to spend its life as a prisoner, pulling at the end of a leash, with a noose structure, politly known as a collar, maintaining its' captivity is going to spend a life not worth living as a canine.


If you'd read the posts carefully you'd have noticed the proviso "except in a safe place", not that they can never be let off the lead at all.

On other forums I've seen people with their own hidden (sometimes even open) agenda of cruelty recommending adversive methods such as prong collars and shock collars as a cure-all. Luckily the Welsh have made the first move and banned them.
- By furriefriends [gb] Date 29.05.12 07:27 GMT
Sorry being thick here not sure I understand your comment re hidden agenda of positive traing and treat training. Are you implying that positive methods are wrong and we need to do back to the harsh methods previously used ?   J;G- agree its often mediia fils etc that cause an increase. In ownership of certain breeds often to most unsuitable owners however the current trend for staffs or similar still puzzles me other than broad indictions of certain needs of a growing element of out society ie status and human violence
- By Hethspaw [gb] Date 29.05.12 07:46 GMT Edited 29.05.12 07:51 GMT
it's the fallout from the 'Snowdogs' films, which are very popular with families

Ahhh..right...gotchya

Auxilary question to posters.

'Should 'Snowdogs' films be banned because of the films Husky rescue's state they are full & cannot cope as a result the films? serious question based on the acceptance of the statement of fact made by another poster.

To add for clarity, I have never heard of snowdogs films but as the fact of the consequences of the films has been put forward I thought it fair to ask as an auxilery question, in the light of the new facts (as stated by another poster).
- By Hethspaw [gb] Date 29.05.12 07:57 GMT Edited 29.05.12 08:04 GMT
Sorry being thick here not sure I understand your comment re hidden agenda of positive traing and treat training. Are you implying that positive methods are wrong and we need to do back to the harsh methods previously used ?   J;G- agree its often mediia fils etc that cause an increase. In ownership of certain breeds often to most unsuitable owners however the current trend for staffs or similar still puzzles me other than broad indictions of certain needs of a growing element of out society ie status and human violence

I don't wish to post in an offensive or condesending manner or speak to you as if you were a simpleton, but, the topic starter was one question, now followed by an auxilery question, so to clarify the obvious......

Should Husky's be banned from UK on animal welfare grounds:

Say "Yes" if you think they should

Say "No" if you think they should not
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- By dogs a babe Date 29.05.12 08:04 GMT Edited 29.05.12 09:28 GMT
With regard to dogs that cannot be let off lead it's important to note the proviso 'except in a safe place' and to ensure that breeders and breed clubs remain focussed on education and support.  Inevitably there will be some new owners that simply aren't suitable and others who genuinely misunderstand the requirements of ownership but it's not necessary to ban the breeds.  Although I'd really like to see these husky breeds unavailable to puppy farmers (somewhat unrealistic I know, but puppy farmers have got to become better legislated)

I have a desire for one of the smaller hounds - another breed that may prove difficult to let off lead due to it's urge to hunt.  I won't have one until I'm in a position to manage this more effectively, either by simply including it (on lead) in all my activities or by properly fencing a large paddock or field for free running, or more likely, both.  Either way the time isn't now.  In the meantime I continue to educate myself about ownership requirements of this breed and the breed in general - so I can be ready! 
- By Goldmali Date 29.05.12 08:30 GMT
my question is, do folks think it is now time to ban Husky's from UK on the grounds of animal welfare?

That is a totally immaterial question whatever your views -look how well it worked to ban breeds in the past! Only made them MORE popular.
- By waggamama [gb] Date 29.05.12 09:36 GMT
Are you collecting information for an article, or research purposes?
- By LJS Date 29.05.12 09:57 GMT
Hewspath all due respect I think asking a question about what form of training you are condoning is quite valid as you have mentioned it in your first post and it is not clear . I am not a simpleton either as the other person asking the question :-)

I would also say social and economic conditions are also a  major factor in why husky rescue amongst all breed rescues are struggling . Also BYB breeders churning out puppies without any concern about the types of homes they are selling to is also a good reason as husky like many breeds should only be for the experienced owner.

 
- By Carrington Date 29.05.12 10:06 GMT
Should Husky's be banned from UK on animal welfare grounds:

No!

Why? Because many are in the wrong home?

It is not just the Husky breed which is in the wrong home, you can pull out almost any breed, and there are plenty of breeds which many owners keep on lead, so not sure why the Husky is just being discussed here.

I know three Husky owners whose dogs are very well cared for they have plenty of land where they run free and exercise to their hearts content and off their own land they are harnessed to run with bikes or sometimes walk on a long line.

Why should a breed be banned from the UK when plenty have fabulous homes?

However, I also agree plenty don't.......... and rescues are proof of re-homing not just the Husky but almost every breed there is.

A more relevant and practical survey and question if you wanted to do one, should be:

Should Husky's be bred by people who do not have the breeds interests and welfare at heart?

Should just anyone who waves a wad of cash be allowed a Husky?

If breeding of all breeds was done only by responsible breeders who vetted carefully, we would not have a problem with any breed.

But, alas no laws are in place to cap breeding by anyone and everyone, other than what the KC are trying to do.

Why should responsible breeders and good owners be penalized in such a way, for the many idiots on the planet?

I agree something needs to be done for many, many, breeds of domestic dog, but banning them won't help, stopping just anyone from breeding will.

You have to go to the source!
- By furriefriends [gb] Date 29.05.12 10:06 GMT
no offense taken I know I am not thick :) . It wasnt the should "huskys' be banned" it was the hidden agended re treat training that I want sure what you meant.
In reply to the former question I dont believe the breed should be banned as others have said in an ideal world breeds would be owned by those that can fully cater for their needs. Also as goldimal said the whole question in practise is imaterial seeing how unsuccessful banning has been in other breeds
- By Roxylola [gb] Date 29.05.12 12:17 GMT
I have a little hound, dog people are frequently astounded that I let off lead (I think more astounded that she comes back)  I have worked hard on training and she has a good time off lead, she is not perfect but she is safe.  I know plenty of those little hounds who are never let off lead and they are managed appropriately, nobody talks about banning them.
- By Brainless [gb] Date 29.05.12 14:35 GMT
In many countries dogs do not have the freedom to run free off the owners property at all, exercise off home ground is on lead, and the dogs are perfectly happy.

Due to the negative effect on both other dog owners and general publics tolerance levels of less than perfectly controlled/behaved dogs, in large part caused by owners of unruly/aggressive bully breed and other macho dogs in the local parks, I no longer free run my dogs.

There is no pleasure, as it isn't worth the hassle of constantly getting five/six dogs back on lead or worrying about instant recall in a breed that tends to have a deaf un if there is a good scent or something takes their interest.

Guess what they are happy fit dogs, PLAYING IN THE GARDEN AND ROAD WORK/WALKS BEING ENOUGH FOR THEM, though their exercise requirements are not huge compared to sled dogs, even though they could go all day.

I do miss seeing them off lead able to pelt around at full speed but that in itself would cause nuisance to other park users. I have been know to sneak them into the tennis courts at night for a romp, though have to leave if they start to play noisily..
- By Harley Date 29.05.12 17:21 GMT

> xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">told they will never recall once adult & can never be let off lead for that reason. <br /><br />There is no question at all, a dog so confined to spend its life as a prisoner, pulling at the end of a leash, with a noose structure, politly known as a collar, maintaining its' captivity is going to spend a life not worth living as a canine.<br />


Just because a dog isn't let off lead it doesn't mean it can't have a purposeful and fulfilled life. I have mentioned before  our rescue terrier as one such dog who is very rarely let off lead - he does go off lead at times but only in a secure area and only where I have 360degree vision. He came to us at about 5 months old having spent the previous months shut in a kitchen cupboard - he received no socialisation or training and had very little interaction with anything at all and I suspect that any he did have was a negative experience.

He has a very good and very fast recall - beats the other dog hands down in reaction times and speed of return BUT that is if there are no distractions at all - and a distraction can be a bird flying, a leaf blowing, a noise in the distance virtually anything at all. He is very prey driven and exceedingly fast - he had a wild pheasant by the tail once, bird was making a huge din and beating it's wings incredibly fast..... the pheasant managed to get off the ground and Cooper went with it up into the air a good six or seven feet still hanging onto it's tail. Dog and bird weren't close enough to me to get there quickly and the only reason they didn't both disappear over the horizon was due to the pheasant's tail feathers coming out thus deposting my dog back down on the ground again.

Having had him disappear into the undergrowth on several occasions and not return when called we came to the decision that he would be walked on a long line unless we were in a totally safe environment - stock fenced and on our own. He can be great with other dogs but is so OTT and excitable that he can cause problems even with dogs he gets on well with. Having him on a long line doesn't give him less quality of life at all - in fact for him it enhances his life. It means he can still run and play with our other dog and those we walk with but more importantly it means he remains safe - he isn't going to disappear over the horizon and get run over by a car, nor meet a sad end on the railway line, he won't get shot by a farmer as we walk through the countryside nor will he be a nuisance to other dogs or animals. It also gives me peace of mind and makes walking him far more enjoyable as I can relax and it has a knock on effect with him too thus making him more relaxed. I just make sure he gets walked for longer than if he was running around off lead but then my dogs have always had long walks each day not just a trip around the block if the weather is nice :-)

He is also walked on a harness with his long line so there is never any pressure at all on the "noose" around his neck.

As long as one is prepared to exercise one's dogs both mentally and physically remaining on lead is sometimes the only responsible thing to do with some dogs. None of my dogs lead a life spent as a prisoner nor do they live a life that is not worth living - they live a life that is best suited to their needs and to their safety.
- By PennyGC [gb] Date 29.05.12 17:24 GMT
er, no because most sensible people who have huskies are aware of the breeds requirements and the dogs have a great time doing what they were bred for - pulling!

go have a look at some husky racing this winter if you want to see how huskies are exercised and kept mentally alert....

most dogs in the wrong hands need some welfare issues sorted... people who want a 'normal' dog shouldn't have a husky, that doesn't mean the breed should be banished....
- By tiggerific [gb] Date 29.05.12 21:30 GMT
Huskys that live in their 'home' climate are often tied up on short tethers with nothing but a small hut that they can curl up in, then they are harnessed up to other dogs and are made to pull something. How is that different to what they ate treated like in the uk?? They do not have time off a harness or tether and they do not get close enough to interact properly with the other dogs, nor do they have the home comforts and treats they do over here! So ban bad breeders I say!
- By floJO [gb] Date 30.05.12 07:16 GMT
There is no question at all, a dog so confined to spend its life as a prisoner, pulling at the end of a leash, with a noose structure, politly known as a collar, maintaining its' captivity is going to spend a life not worth living as a canine.

The predicable result, the dogs become so disruptive and maladjusted they become no longer an an enjoyment to their human owners but a tiresome burden & reduce, to the point of complete ruin, the quality of life for the entire human family the human family get rid of the dog.


Not quite sure what the above is based on but it isn't necessarily the outcome of having a dog exercised on-lead only.

A relative of mine has a husky x malamute.  He walks it for 3 hours everyday, 1 hr in the morning, 1 hr at lunchtime and 1 hr in the evening, whatever the weather or time of year.  He spends some of his working week working from home and some days he is out on the road.  On those days his mother does the mid-day walk.  I have walked this dog (which is bigger than a standard husky) and he never pulls on the lead, ever.  He is not destructive, aggressive nor has any other 'unwanted behaviour traits'.  He is a gem of a dog.  The only downside, everyone who has seen this dog has wanted one and there was a sharp up-turn in the number of huskies that appeared on the estate where my relative lives.  Despite being told how much exercise these types of dogs needed some people went ahead and got one only to find they couldn't commit to the level of exercise required.

This isn't the husky's fault but of owners buying the wrong dog for them on a whim and this could happen for any breed.

When you look at how snow dogs usually spend their life in their natural habitiat, they run together tethered and are staked out when resting.  Not much different to one kept as a pet then really and how they are trained doesn't really have a bearing on how they 'live'.
- By Brainless [gb] Date 30.05.12 16:50 GMT

> The only downside, everyone who has seen this dog has wanted one and there was a sharp up-turn in the number of huskies that appeared on the estate


This is a problem I have encountered as my dogs are very popular around here when I walk them in the day, I can't go far withotu them gathering a fanclub (I also do a lot of nightime walking to actually get some decent excersise).

Most people are convinced (despite my explanations) that they are husky's so bingo they get a husky cross or Mal cross utonogan etc and then ask me whey their dog is not like mine, different breed or mixed breed folks.
- By Nikita [gb] Date 31.05.12 13:40 GMT
I don't think they should be banned - as with so many breeds, it's being in the wrong home that's the problem.  There are plenty of people out there who can and will provide for a husky's needs - I saw one of them this morning, a bloke with a proper walking belt walking three siberians.  They were beautifully behaved, no pulling, very calm and sociable.

I also have a friend who runs hers and competes with them - she doesn't have a big racing kennel like many people do, she just has a little terraced house, but she works hard to give her dogs what they need.

The key to the problem is the dogs not ending up with those sort of people - it's the folks who get one 'because they look nice' that are the problem.  Some people like myself are sensible enough to do all the research for years and draw the conclusion that we are NOT suitable owners and therefore do not get a husky - far too many just don't bother.  That's the issue.
- By Starlite [gb] Date 24.07.12 10:12 GMT
Absolutely not!

As the owner of an Alaskan Malamute and having helped out with a husky rescue group I can say its the owner that is the problem not the dog. I trained my 7 stone Malamute for months on end and still do training with her. She has walked beside my newborn in his pram and NEVER pulled. Put a harness on her and its a different story, she knows the harness means pull as we have done weight training.

People are buying them for their looks and doing no research on them, then wondering why they cant cope!
No thry cant be let offlead one of their best and frustrating traits which we have chosen no to breed out. What it means is you have to put alot more effort into keeping your dog execrised and most people just cant hack 2/3hrs minimum a day. That isnt the dogs fault.
- By inka [ie] Date 24.07.12 10:21 GMT
Quick point - owners of sighthounds are typically told our dogs can never be let off lead either. Simply untrue. Yes,  I take more precautions and let mine off in a more secure area than a random person who lets their labrador off on the street (but i probably still would do this if i had a JRT) and spent ages teaching a strong recall, but my dogs are off lead every day. I don't claim to know but I imagine it at least a remotely similar case with huskies. No well meaning but poorly prepared owner should let any dog, regardless of breed, off lead.
- By Siberianski [gb] Date 06.08.12 09:00 GMT
Honest answer no they shouldnt be banned, i know alot of people with sibes and mallys whose dogs have a great standard of life. I dont race my dogs as there too young but down the line we are gonna get a scooter and run them just for fun.

I have two sibes one a rescue and the other we adopted, our first we purchased in february, both are well behaved, both get walked on lunge lines and have a very good standard of life. Both of our dogs get walked easily 3-5mile daily they get loads of attention.  My youngest dog has been through two puppy training classes obedience and foundation, i never let them off the lead bar in one place. She has free run 1-2 times a week of a huge tennis court next to where my partner works.

Alot of the problems with sibes is as already said there a pretty dog, (eight below, snow dogs, iron will, snow buddies) maybe these films play a part but unregulated breeding is a major issue. I challenge any one to go on preloved/gumtree and not find someone selling husky pups within 10miles of them. This imo is the problem and the fact people walk into getting without doing research.
We prior to getting our first read books on sibes/went to dog shows and met breeders/did online research i went in with open eyes and knew what i was getting into alot of people dont.

Breeders yes in part are too blame through dealing recently with HIN and SHCGB recently i have heard of instances where registered KC breeders have refused to take back pups/new dogs that owners have struggled with. I know this as fact as i have friends that foster for both the above rescues.

A quite wealthy man i was informed about six-twelve months ago took his daughter to wales to buy her a puppy, she wanted a puppy and had seen one of the above mentioned films. He took her to wales saw a kc registered breeder, he paid close to 2000pound and came away with two sibes both of really good breeding stock. The guy worked away quite alot, his daughter then in september october started university and then moved away. The dogs got left with the guys wife she couldnt cope, she contacted the breeder for help and advice. They refused to take the dogs back or help. As a result both dogs went into rescue, luckily because of the dogs age they were fostered then adopted quite quick.

I have seen a lot of posts on facebook re gumtree and preloved becoming animal free and i cant support this enough. Prior to getting our second dog we did have a look on preloved just to see what was out there and we were shocked at the quantity of dogs on there.

Re the comments the original poster made i have to disagree i have over the past few months we encountered other dog owners who are irresponsible, my youngest sibe was attacked 2 months ago by an idiot who decided to run his jack russell cross off the lead. Where i live unfortunately there is abit of a mentality to walk your dog off the lead makes you look a big man if you have a staffy/rocky etc Last week i was in shock as i saw a sharpei coming running down the street opposite a school. Its owner didnt even have a lead with him. This also is part the problem.
- By HuskyGal Date 06.08.12 19:54 GMT
Having witnessed what an ill thought out and executed 'ban' has done to the Welfare of other breeds in this Country, I'm loathed to step into an ill though out and executed debate. I suspect the OP's modus operandum is not ultimately that of Siberian Husky welfare.
     My contribution will be simple fact of which the reader may ( and rightly,should) make up their own mind.

I own a male Siberian Husky he is now 9 yrs old ( still acts 2!)
He came to me at 15 months, a typical rehoming age (so,very much relevant to the slant placed on this debate) in full blown 'Kevin the teenager' mode. He had been through 2 previous owners.

Long standing members of the Forum will remember me posting about him 8 years ago (yes! Where has that time gone!!)
He had totally missed out on vital socialisation as a puppy having been kept in a shed, not taken out (and we later found out had been used as a bait dog for dog fighting) sired a litter then was sold via the 'free ad' route to thankfully his second owners who whilst being novice Husky owners at least realised they were making things worse by not knowing how to best handle this dog and approached me for advice ~ I worked with them for a couple of weeks and then admirably and selflessly then gave him up as they realised they could not put the time and work needed in.

So he came to me unruly,unmannered and confused as to his place in the world, not just human but canine.
On a walk he was a lunging,bouncing,frustrated hellion! Interaction with other dogs was fight first ask questions later. I'm going to be totally honest.. I'm not proud, I thought I was an experienced owner having grown up with working hunting dogs and working sled dogs ~ but I remember early days of being exhausted and in tears and whilst I don't agree with it, I can almost understand why people would turn to 'quick fix' or harsh,aversive training methods...

But I'm here to offer my story as evidence that it CAN be done and I did it using positive training methods.
Today I have a Husky that last month I took to Central London to cheer my sister who was running in the London 10k.
   Many of the members here will have seen my photos on Facebook of my Husky on a loose leash in the middle of thronging crowds at Trafalgar Square and outside Big Ben in Parliament  square ~ to get there we walked in a 5 deep crowd all the way up Victoria st & The Mall.
    He walked on a loose leash (lead clip pointing down to ground) and even taught a few tourists a thing or two about pavement etiquette!

I believe from my experience of living with Siberian Huskies that CONSISTENT good management,good understanding and good training will produce a good dog and this in fact is no different to any other breed!

In fairness to the debate I must state, on returning to this Country from living in Iceland/N.America I had to wait 2 years before putting my name down on a Husky puppy list because I did not want to own a Sibe that might not be able to free run, so I had to save and wait to buy land that I could be responsible for ensuring secure fencing to achieve this.
   However at this moment in time I would say my dogs exercise/outdoor time is 70% on lead. I do NOT use leash to collar ( due to C spine concern) but only leash to harness.

I have used the training methods as advocated by Turrid Rugaas, Karen Pryor, Dr.Ian Dunbar et al.
I have a confident,happy and mannerly Siberian Husky be he in a field,Central London or the local park.... He even accompanied me to work and spent the day in a police carrier impressing members of public with his manners and demeanour!
I am more than happy to provide video and photographic evidence and those that know us I'm sure can vouch!

I can only stress again: good training,good understanding,good husbandry you WILL have a good dog.
- By MickB [gb] Date 01.09.12 08:32 GMT Edited 01.09.12 08:34 GMT Upvotes 1
Where to start.......

Firstly, as Secretary of one of the Welfare organisations used as "evidence" for the original poster's contention can I say that the very last thing we would want is any further government interference in the canine world. After all, "banning" breeds has a great track record in the UK - NOT!
Before the DDA, I could have counted the number of pitbulls/pitbull crosses I had seen on the fingers of one finger. Since their "ban" I see dozens every day on the streets of our local estates and in our local parks. There is no reason to suppose that a "ban" would not have a similar effect with huskies (and northern breeds in general - after all the "powers that be" seem to have a huge inability to distinguish between pitbulls, pitbull "types", bullmastiffs, staffies and the variety of crosses of these breeds). So, if huskies were banned, Malamutes, Samoyeds, and a variety of "designer" crossbreeds which have emerged over the past 20 years would also be at risk.

All dog breeds have their breed characteristics, original purposes and idiosynchrasies. Do we ban Dalmations because we no longer have sufficient horse-drawn carriages to keep them gainfully employed? Do we ban Ridgebacks because there are insufficient lions for them to hunt - etc etc. The real issue with Huskies is simple - idiot commercial breeders (whether large scale puppy farmers, backyard breeders or naive/stupid/greedy "pet" breeders) selling poor quality pups from un-health-tested parents to naive, ill-prepared and "looks obsessed" new owners. The current breed rescue crisis has little or nothing to do with the "off-lead" issue and everything to do with irresponsible breeding. Twenty years ago the vast majority of Siberian Husky breeders were responsible, ethical and passionate about the breed (not about the money it could bring in). There were one or two well-known puppy farmers/backyard breeders but their output of pups was not large enough to significantly create a rescue problem. Today, there are still a few of these "bulk breeders" but the real, immediate problem is caused by huge numbers of what I referred to above as naive/stupid/greedy "pet" breeders. Probably 90% of the unwanted Siberians which come into our rescue are bred by such people. These are "breeders" who have never shown or worked their dogs (and so would have not the faintest idea of whether they are a good enough example of the breed to warrant reproduction), who think that breed specific health tests means their vet saying that the dog is healthy (and that is the more conscientious "pet" breeders - most have probably never seen a vet) and whose only interest in their litters is the money they can generate.
A "ban" would make no difference to such people any more than it did to those breeding pitbulls and their derivatives  - if anything it would broaden and enliven their "market".
The only longterm, effective answer to this problem is not legislation or regulation, but EDUCATION to minimise the purchase of the breed by ill-informed, ill-prepared members of the public.

We currently own a dozen huskies which never go off lead in unenclosed areas. This doesn't mean they never go offlead and they all have very good recall because we train them. We know we could never trust their recall 100% however, so we don't put them at risk, unlike dozens of the non-husky offlead dogs I see daily in our local park whose owners have absolutely no control over them at all. They get plenty of offlead exercise as well as running in harness (which they love almost as much as sleeping or eating) and I would challenge anyone, anywhere to find a happier, more content pack of dogs. Prisoners - I don't think so!!!
- By MickB [gb] Date 01.09.12 09:48 GMT
Just to add - sorry I came to this post so late - someone drew my attention to this thread this morning - only 3 months late!!
- By zuluhour [gb] Date 18.06.13 20:40 GMT
Yes they should be banned, I know a woman with 9, never let off the lead, not worked, just in and out of the garden, and a quick walk each day, crop in hand. Now the one who won bob at crufts a few years ago has turned nasty. He has also sired a litter, all totally wrong
- By Akitamummy [gb] Date 12.06.15 16:33 GMT
Huskys are fine, positive reinforcement is fine, it's just that unfortunately the wrong people are buying this stunning breed, I don't really like the idea of letting dogs off leash as I think my dog is safer on a long, extended leash, it goes to 8 meters and I'm not sure I'd want her much further then that from me... she is an Akita, and loves to run and play... I take her to a local secure area, here I can shut the gate, and she can run, no other dogs and no other people, in my area husky dogs are very popular, many of them in good hands but one or two in not so good hands, one in particular, the 'man' of the family seems to believe in strong dominance based training... on the odd occasion that he may take the dog out he can be heard shouting, 'No I go out first not you, you will wait for me' he's the poster child for the 'small dominant weed' movement I so regularly have the misfortune to re educate, I must say I get a degree of pleasure from taking them down a few pegs, making sure I spend plentiful time reassuring them that their so called training techniques are nothing more then your average verbal diahorrea! In summary HUSKYS SHOULD NOT BE BANNED, SMALL DOMINANT WEEDS SHOULD BE, not sure if I've mentioned in previous comments but I am anti dangerous dogs act and anti banned breeds
Jess x
- By Jo64 [gb] Date 19.08.15 21:13 GMT
So how many years ago did they ban pit bulls ???
Yet STILL they are being bred sold given away and walked around in broad day light without a muzzle on ... So why or how are they going to ban Huskys ?
- By tinar Date 21.08.15 23:53 GMT Upvotes 1

> So how many years ago did they ban pit bulls ???<br />Yet STILL they are being bred sold given away and walked around in broad day light without a muzzle on ... So why or how are they going to ban Huskys ?


They were banned 24 years ago.

I for one haven't seen one for years however I know there have been incidents though they are mostly up north in Manchester, Merseyside, some in the midlands and London.

You have to remember though - some pitbulls out there are permitted and registered (but very very few now I would think) and the rest... well unfortunately it is a fact that 99% of the owners are criminals.. that is why they want them... and that is why they don't care about them being banned... drug dealers getting pitbulls to guard them, their stock and their house, used to attack policemen if they attend to do searches etc.... those really are the sort of people that have them... that and criminals still doing underground dog fighting or breeding them without other breeds to try and create a "legal" pitbull (though if they have any look or mannerism of one they can still be classed as a pit-bull type but its harder to prove).. all for money.... those people don't care about Dangerous Dogs Laws - they commit higher risk crimes all the time and care only for money.

I'm sorry I had to post - some things simply cant be stopped altogether - someone who speeds 75 mph in a 50 mph zone is not going to care if the road's speed limit gets changed to 40 mph - robbers don't stop stealing because they might go to jail - and people illegally owning pitbulls cant stop entirely while the people that own and either smuggle them in or breed them are either making money from them or getting something out of having them (like fierce fight trained dogs willing to stop a policeman in a house search etc).  Though, I must admit I don't see them walked around in broad daylight either with or without a muzzle on ... and don't know anyone who has... or has been prosecuted for having one ... at least not down in the south west where I live....and believe me if I saw one I would definitely report it as they scare the bejeezus out of me, not just because of their look and reputation but mostly because the owners scare me!

As for huskies - I don't think they should be banned or restricted at all - I do however think that potential owners should consider their choice of breed very seriously since they are not appropriate for many household situations I believe and it seems they are popular (at least around me) these days... and quite hard work in the wrong hands - I have seen many an owner struggling to walk them on leads well and interacting poorly with other people and dogs on walks.... they are only difficult in the wrong hands, in the wrong home and with the wrong level of training and exercise in my opinion though - they haven't had their temperament made unstable, completely ruined in fact, like the pitbulls were by their owner-breeders...
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