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Up Topic Dog Boards / Behaviour / new tricks for the "old" dog?
- By janeze [gb] Date 12.06.17 13:31 GMT
Hello, I’m hoping to get some advice. Since Christmas we’ve been walking a dog for a lady, 6 yo standard wirehaired dachshund. We do it couple of weekends in a month, about 3 hour walk and then staying at ours for couple of hours until she picks him up. We were planning to get our own puppy in the autumn and has found a breeder. But recently, the lady asked us if we’d like to have her dog, the one we are walking, as she finds it increasingly difficult to look after him as well as she’d have liked…. We love him but he is absolutely untrained. He is very good with our children (9 and 4yo) and ignores ALL the dogs on his walks. So, do you think we could teach a grown up dachshund:
- basics like “wait”, “drop” and walking to heel
- recall
- at least minimize a little his obsession with squirrels
- can/should we change his name and at what stage?
Thank you!
- By monkeyj [gb] Date 12.06.17 14:06 GMT
Change name - yes any time. Basics like wait, drop also should be no problem. Recall - it depends, I think you won't know until you try :smile: Some dogs are just better than others in this respect.
- By Nikita [gb] Date 12.06.17 14:40 GMT
Name and basics - yep, no problem.  Recall - depends on the dog!  Thoeretically not an issue but individuals can always be exceptions to that.  Ditto squirrels!

The name you can do right away.  Playing the Name Game will soon cement it in - handful of awesome treats, dog in front of you and paying attention.  Say the new name, give him a treat immediately.  Repeat, repeat, repeat.  Don't delay between saying it and giving him the treat, and pause before you do it again so the connection is clear.  He'll soon get the hang of it!
- By furriefriends [gb] Date 12.06.17 16:00 GMT
Recall.i have just trained my 6 year old to the whistle .she and I had no experience before but she picked it up very quickly and   I wish I had done it sooner. If u go for it start at home and in the garden and she. That's happening securely  move to outside with a long line for safety .  I think kiki pup in tube has some example software how to do it.i have a acme gundog whistle from Amazon
- By janeze [gb] Date 12.06.17 16:08 GMT
Thanks! I understand that recall and especially squirrels can be tricky. The rest sounds quite positive... We'd probably risk it and go for him instead of a puppy....
- By janeze [gb] Date 12.06.17 16:12 GMT
Oh, I quite like the whistle idea, I'd try it - thank you
- By MamaBas Date 12.06.17 16:15 GMT
You may well find any Dachshund something of a challenge - but not to say getting the basics sorted out can't be done.   Like most hounds (I'd suggest all, but that would be unfair), there is an element of 'she can't mean me' in them and for sure, if you get stubborn, you have to change your approach.   Just as with Bassets, it's about making what you want, seem to them to be their idea.   You have to have the recall solid or being off the lead isn't going to safely happen.  I'd imagine by this time, walking alongside you should be able to be done - or you will have to settle for not tugging.   Leave/drop is also needed just in case he gets hold of something dangerous to him.   I always use 'trade' to do this.

The squirrel thing - hum.   I'd suggest this is down to eyes in the back of your head ..... anticipation/prevention.   He is a hound after all.   Actually I'm more than happy for my Whippet to see 'em off when they come in after the bird peanuts etc!

Changing name - well you can, but it might make for an extra challenge re the recall.   Is his name THAT bad?

He can manage a 3 hour walk?   He must be one fit lad.   I'd be careful not do overdo - given he's not a youngster.

I had a long line (30 ft) and a whistle for my Whippet early days, but had to be dead careful she didn't run to the end of the line at full tilt, given her fragile neck.  Actually she learnt to come quite quickly so working with the long line wasn't needed much.  Come with my Basset(s).  Hum.   With our small pack, I had some who'd obey more than the others so if I got them to come, the rest came!!  With our first Basset, I can remember having him out in a local park when no way would be come when called.  I'd hide behind trees, keeping an eye on him, and eventually once the 'hot scent' wasn't so interesting, he'd stop and look round for me, and come running to where I'd last been ..................
- By janeze [gb] Date 12.06.17 16:43 GMT
MamaBas, I must say "an element of 'she can't mean me'" sounds priceless!
ATM there is no recall at all, at least for us, his owner though lets him off the lead in the park and he just comes back when he had his run around, but she is quite a relaxed person on the whole. So he is always on the lead with us.
The name is not that bad :) - we just do not like it. But because there are all these training issues I wasn't sure whether and when we should or can change it...
That's quite a slow walk actually from her house to ours through couple of parks with stops - playgrounds, ice-cream and such.
As for the care on the long line - he is on this horrible (IMO) flexi lead and yesterday he literally flied into the air at the end of it while trying to run after the squirrel up the tree...
- By monkeyj [gb] Date 12.06.17 17:26 GMT
There is a Flexi variety - I think its called "Vario" - which has a shock absorber attachment to it.

I like Flexies as it allows those of my dogs that I cannot let off the lead to run almost freely, two at a time. The trick with Flexies is to move your arm back whenever the dog sets off into a run, that way the dog gets a notice when the line ends and slows down in time. The shock absorber attachment makes it even safer.

Incidentally I found out about the shock absorber while looking for a solution to my dog playing with/chewing the lead. It was a bad habit which was difficult to get rid of, and Flexies (tape ones) used to last a week or so with her behaviour! Then I got the one with the shock absorber, which happens to be just in the right place where she grabs and tugs, and its been heaven ever since, the absorber "absorbs" all her bites :smile:
- By furriefriends [gb] Date 12.06.17 17:26 GMT
Just to add if u do use a long line please always use a harness for safety.so easy to do damage to necks . I find d flexis are anughtnare u less used as a long line and firmly locked although the locks can and do fail . I can also never see the thin cord ones
- By janeze [gb] Date 12.06.17 17:44 GMT
Thank you - I'll bear all the above in mind when we get to the stage of buying our own "stuff" for him.
- By Harley Date 12.06.17 18:17 GMT
My  thought on this is .................. is he the type of dog you would have chosen to have if he had not been offered to you? If he is then go for it and with him you do know what you are getting.

If he isn't the sort of dog you would have chosen for yourselves I would weigh up the differences between having this dog and having whatever dog you would have chosen before you were asked to consider having him. Getting a dog is a huge responsibility and you need to ensure that your choice of dog is made for the right reason - you will be living with that dog for a long time.

Not trying to put you off nor sway your opinion one way or another but the dog you get has to be the dog you want rather than one that is available. If he ticks all your boxes then he would be ideal for you - if he doesn't or you have reservations you need to think it all through before saying yes to him.
- By janeze [gb] Date 12.06.17 18:49 GMT
Harley, thanks for the post. I've been researching the right breed for more than a year... and even when we finally narrowed down to two and then to one and even started "talks" with the breeder - I'm still not quite sure but that's probably just me. The breed we chose was wire haired dachshund, that's why it was so lucky to get the chance to get to know this particular dog. I find that with relatively young kids you have to consider so many things - temperament, activity level, size, even efforts/time for grooming.... I think now there are no ideal, easy dogs, with each breed you compromise on smth. When we met him we were rather smitten - so chilled out, so patient with kids, friendly. I guess, everything that's "wrong" with him is due to the lack of training and some breed characteristics, though, I guess, any dog might be mad about squirrels.... I understand that it will take much effort to turn him around, but there is a lot of work with the puppy as well... Oh, I don't know....
- By furriefriends [gb] Date 12.06.17 20:46 GMT
If u do decide to go a head one thing you will have over a pup is knowledge of what he is like .I know with a pup u can mould them more but an adult you have that assured knowledge especially as u have known him.for a while.and who know later  u may decide to have a pup as well :)
- By janeze [gb] Date 12.06.17 21:17 GMT
That is true actually :))
- By Harley Date 12.06.17 22:01 GMT
From what you have written in your reply to me this dog sounds like the ideal boy for you :grin: Him being comfortable around your young children is great and yes he may need some training in some areas but none of those areas are impossible ones to train. One of mine is a squirrel hunter - and a successful one too :sad: - but he is a superb dog to live with, obedient, gentle, active when I need him to be and a couch potato when I need it. No dog is perfect all of the time however much we would like them to be.

My newest dog is a rescue who spent his early life chained on a farm so he had no socialisation whatsoever, caught his own food and hadn't lived in a house until he went into rescue. I took him knowing it wouldn't be easy and it hasn't been - but in some areas he is amazing. I fully expected to have to housetrain him as he had only ever lived outside - never had an accident indoors at all. He has lots of other issues and with a rescue you never really know what you have got until a good few months down the line. Whereas with the dog that you have been offered you know exactly what you are getting and know that he fits in with your family.
- By janeze [gb] Date 13.06.17 00:22 GMT
It is so reassuring to hear from a person with experience that smth I think might be right IS actually right  - appreciate it, Harley.
Also, your newest dog - hats off to you!
- By LucyDogs [gb] Date 13.06.17 08:20 GMT
I'd use his 'old' name for now and put in the new one as a nickname and he'll soon learn it. My dogs all answer to things like nitwit, superdog, twirly girl as well as their real names. :-D
- By janeze [gb] Date 13.06.17 08:51 GMT Upvotes 1
That sounds good, and then I can add the before mentioned Name Game. On a different note - surely, with cavalier looks one can't be a nitwit :grin:
- By MamaBas Date 13.06.17 10:42 GMT
Just to add I'm against Flexi leads - all too often I sit here watching owners walk past on the pavement with it fully extended.   Don't they realise that if there's something across the road, the dog can and will dart sideways, and be right across the road?    This allowing the dog to run around whilst still on a lead is, with respect, a lazy option.   If the dog needs to be on a lead, 5 or 6 foot is the absolute maximum length for any owner to have any control over the dog when on a lead.  If it would enjoy running around, which they all do, work on the RECALL!!

I also want to assure people, re my 30 ft lunge line, that I was aware re my Whippet's neck.  She didn't need that for long in any case.

Also, when switching from my original Bassets, because I felt I needed something lighter (weight) and maybe taller, I did consider the Standard Wirehair Dachsie because they are such characters - but that wouldn't have given me 'taller'. :grin:
- By monkeyj [gb] Date 13.06.17 11:44 GMT Upvotes 1

> Just to add I'm against Flexi leads - all too often I sit here watching owners walk past on the pavement with it fully extended.   Don't they realise that if there's something across the road, the dog can and will dart sideways, and be right across the road?    This allowing the dog to run around whilst still on a lead is, with respect, a lazy option.   If the dog needs to be on a lead, 5 or 6 foot is the absolute maximum length for any owner to have any control over the dog when on a lead.  If it would enjoy running around, which they all do, work on the RECALL!!


Very much disagree. For one thing, the fact that some owners walk alongside roads with Flexies extended is no fault of the lead, but of the owners. As for being a lazy option, not all dogs can be taught recall to allow safe off-lead walking, nowhere near it, no matter how much you capitalise. I walk two small terriers at a time, and they have a great time running around while I walk, the 5m Flexi leads allow this as well as ensure the dogs are kept under full control (coupled with my eyes and ears of course).

I have nothing against lunge line, however to use it you need two hands - which means only one dog can be walked at a time.
- By LucyDogs [gb] Date 13.06.17 13:05 GMT

>surely, with cavalier looks one can't be a nitwit :grin:


Don't you believe it - they also sometimes get 'ratbag' :lol::lol:
- By Nikita [gb] Date 13.06.17 13:22 GMT Upvotes 1

> This allowing the dog to run around whilst still on a lead is, with respect, a lazy option.   If the dog needs to be on a lead, 5 or 6 foot is the absolute maximum length for any owner to have any control over the dog when on a lead.  If it would enjoy running around, which they all do, work on the RECALL!!


Very unfair to the owners of dogs that, for whatever reason, cannot be off the lead.  Not every dog can be taught to reliably recall, and they may be on there for medical reasons as well - limited exertion allowed but some freedom still needed.

I agree that using them alongside roads is hideously irresponsible and dangerous, but please don't tar us all with the same brush - many of us use flexis responsibly to allow dogs a bit of freedom.  I use one three times a week for clients' dogs who will never be reliable off lead, but need more freedom than a regular lead allows - they are never on them near roads, they are not allowed to run up and bother others, etc etc.  As with any bit of kit, it's how it's used and it is most certainly NOT me being lazy.  If anything, allowing them off to do what they wanted would be the lazy option as on flexi, I have to be actively involved, watching them, keeping an eye on where they are going so the lead doesn't get tangled or they can't run up and so on.
- By RozzieRetriever Date 13.06.17 13:36 GMT
Agreed, but there are so many thoughtless users. My neighbours legs were badly lacerated when a dog on a fully extended flexi lead ran round and round her. The lead tightened and the next thing she's lying on the grass with nasty cuts on her legs.
- By Nikita [gb] Date 13.06.17 14:54 GMT
Absolutely - I've had rope burn on my hand from an idiot with a crazy 17w old dobe on it who was running riot through all the dogs at the park, round legs etc.  She ran round me, I tried to grab for the webbing part near her collar and missed.  But it is the owner at fault, not the lead - I ran into the same dog a couple of years later out in the countryside, now off lead and still being allowed to run up to and around whoever she wanted.  No control whatsoever.
- By MamaBas Date 14.06.17 08:26 GMT Upvotes 1

> For one thing, the fact that some owners walk alongside roads with Flexies extended is no fault of the lead, but of the owners


OMG!!   Why do I get picked up on EVERY LITTLE THING I say around here  :evil:.   Just to be picky (sigh), actually the fact that this type of lead extends way too far, does mean it's to some degree, the fault of the TYPE of lead.   I agree, once off a road, onto an open safe area, this might be the only option for some people who have a dog without a recall.

Further, I'd never use a lunge line out on the roads.    I have a fully enclosed field nearby which I used to train my Whippet.

All I can say ....... or will because this place is irritating at times.   Sorry.
- By jogold [gb] Date 14.06.17 09:45 GMT Upvotes 1
I agree with you MamaBas I detest flexi leads people seem to be of the opinion that If it's on a lead it's safe.
But I'm sick of watching dogs mostly small ones running riot then their owners complain when it gets into trouble.
Some even still let them go in enclosed areas like pet shops which is highly dangerous if it right across the aisles as you could Trip over it.
- By monkeyj [gb] Date 14.06.17 11:59 GMT Upvotes 1

> OMG!!   Why do I get picked up on EVERY LITTLE THING I say around here  <img class="fsm fsm_evil" src="/images/epx.png" title="evil" alt=":evil:" />.


Because I believed what you said was incorrect, and everyone is entitled to voice their opinion :smile: Hence:

> Just to be picky (sigh), actually the fact that this type of lead extends way too far, does mean it's to some degree, the fault of the TYPE of lead.


in my vew this is incorrect again, the fact that the lead can extend to 5m, or 8m, or 10m - is not a fault, it is a design. It becomes up to the owner to judge the safe distance.
- By MamaBas Date 14.06.17 12:22 GMT

> It becomes up to the owner to judge the safe distance.


If only!!
- By Admin (Administrator) Date 14.06.17 12:26 GMT
Facebook Replies:

Janine Wilbraham says:  i trained a gsd who was older and he turned out really good, I used lots of tiny treats and he soon clicked on.might be worth taking him to training classes as well

Catherine Lewis says: Definitely don't change the poor dog's name - there isn't any need for it and he will be confused and lost.
Otherwise there is no reason he can't learn new things as long as you make sure you train him positively with plenty of reward and encouragement.


Linda Obrien says: U most definitely could change his name. Lots of dogs in rescue etc have new names cos previous one unknown.
Perhaps pick something that sounds a bit similar
- By furriefriends [gb] Date 14.06.17 13:39 GMT Edited 14.06.17 13:42 GMT
I have a dog that at least for now cannot be off l  I use a long line and harness it's not her  recall which is fine .as Nikita says there are different reasons for long lines  . obviously this is only used when we are in woods and fields so we are all safe . .I find flat lines much better than flexi leads if you need to have the restriction
- By Nikita [gb] Date 14.06.17 14:47 GMT Upvotes 2

> This allowing the dog to run around whilst still on a lead is, with respect, a lazy option.   If the dog needs to be on a lead, 5 or 6 foot is the absolute maximum length for any owner to have any control over the dog when on a lead.  If it would enjoy running around, which they all do, work on the RECALL!!


If you're going to call a huge swathe of owners lazy, you are going to be responded to.  If you make the generalisation that users of flexis just need to work on the dog's recall, as if it's always that simple, you are going to get responded to.  Welcome to the world of the forum.

> I agree, once off a road, onto an open safe area, this might be the only option for some people who have a dog without a recall.


If you'd said that before, I'd not have said anything but what you wrote above was that having a dog on a flexi is lazy.  Full stop.

Incidentally, a 5 or 6ft lead is more than enough for a dog to get onto the road in front of a car on many pavements.  Again, it's the user, not the tool.
- By Jodi [gb] Date 14.06.17 15:07 GMT
My last two dogs both went deaf as they aged and needed to be on a lead for their own safety especially one of them who assumed because she couldn't hear you calling that she didn't have to recall to me, so would amble along off into the middle distance. Using a flexi enabled her to have a bit of freedom on our walks. But.....
I've used flexis for years, almost as soon as they came out and I know how to use them, know how to reel a dog in, know to keep them on a short locked lead (and a finger on the lock to make sure) when we walking along a road. Some don't seem to have this common sense knowledge or just couldn't care less and that's when flexis become a liability rather then allowing dogs to have a bit of freedom but still having the ultimate control.

My current dog has a very good recall, is a friendly quiet dog and is mainly off lead during her walks, but there are occasions where she has to be on a lead and the flexi allows her to trot on ahead a bit or lag behind at an interesting sniff when walking through fields or whatever (obviously not along a road:grin:).
Personally I wouldn't be without the flexi lead option in amongst all the other dog walking equipment I seem to have.
- By Agility tervs [gb] Date 14.06.17 18:40 GMT Upvotes 1
I was driving out of my street (quiet cul-de-sac) when I noticed a dog on the pavement at one side. I then saw the flexilead stretched across the road in front of me. The person on the other end was so far behind the dog I couldn't see them for the hedge in front of the houses.
Up Topic Dog Boards / Behaviour / new tricks for the "old" dog?

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